• Call For Free Consultation: 9833911784, 9833220134
  • Mon - Sun: 9:00AM - 10:00PM Enquries : 9:00AM - 9:00PM

Viennese Waltz Characteristics

The Viennese waltz is a rotary dance where the dancers are constantly turning either toward the leader's right (natural) or toward the leader's left (reverse), interspersed with non-rotating change steps to switch between the direction of rotation. Furthermore, in a properly danced Viennese waltz, couples do not pass but turn continuously left and right while traveling counterclockwise around the floor following each other.

As the waltz evolved, some of the versions that were done at about the original fast tempo came to be called specifically "Viennese waltz" to distinguish them from the slower waltzes.

In the modern ballroom dance, two versions of Viennese waltz are recognized: International Style and American Style.

The Viennese waltz, so called to distinguish it from the waltz and the French waltz, is the oldest of the current ballroom dances. It emerged in the second half of the 18th century from the German dance and the Ländler in Austria and was popular .

The first record of a dance to 3/4 rhythm is a peasant dance of the Provence area of France in 1559, as a piece of folk music called the VoltaIn the late 50's & 60's group dances began to evolve in Bollywood films & choreographers started managing larger groups of dancers, with influences from folk dances. Then came the 70s and bollywood dancing changed quite a bit. It became more mainstream and was used in many movies. Then, it was replaced by Disco, which was a worldwide phenomenon at the time.

The Volta required the partners to dance in a closed position but with the lady to the left of the man! The man held the lady about the waist, and the lady put her right arm on the man's shoulders, and held her skirt with her left. This was necessary to stop it flying up, because the dance involved the man lifting the lady using his left thigh under the lady's right thigh.

In 1812 the dance was introduced into England under the name of the German Waltz. It caused a great sensation,

Through the 19th Century, the dance stabilized, and was further popularised by the music of Josef and Johann Strauss.

The Viennese waltz is a rotary dance where the dancers are constantly turning either in a clockwise (natural) or anti-clockwise (reverse) direction interspersed with non-rotating change steps to switch between the direction of rotation. A true Viennese waltz consists only of turns and change steps. Other moves such as the fleckerls, American-style figures and side sway or underarm turns are modern inventions and are not normally danced at the annual balls in Vienna. Furthermore, in a properly danced Viennese waltz, couples do not pass, but turn continuously left and right while travelling counterclockwise around the floor following each other.

The competitive style of Viennese waltz has a reduced number of steps: change steps, passing changes, hesitations, hovers, the contra check, and natural and reverse turns

The Viennese Waltz is a dance performed to music with three beats to the bar. This means that if a step is taken on each beat, then each bar starts with the opposite foot to that of the previous bar. 

Viennese waltz is danced at about 180 beats (58-60 measures) per minute. 

Sr.No. BRONZE SILVER GOLD
1 Reverse Turn Reverse Fleckerl Natural Fleckerl
2 Natural Turn Contra Check
3 Forward Change, Natural to Reverse
4 Forward Change, Reverse to Natural
5 Backward Change, Natural to Reverse
6 Backward Change, Reverse to Natural
Sr.No. BRONZE SILVER GOLD
1 Basic Left Turn Underarm Turn
2 Left Hesitation Turn Parallel Run
3 Basic Right Turn Counter
4 Right Hesitation Turn Kick and Run
5 Side Cross Hesitation Open Cantor
6 Forward Hesitation Fan and Twinkle
7 Progressive Hesitation Twist Turn
8 Curtsey Hesitation Underarm Turn in Center Time
9 Right Outside Run-Around Sweetheart Canter
10 Run-Around Walk Advanced Balance Combination
11 Center Rocks Left
12 Center Rocks Right
13 Left Fleckerl
14 Right Fleckerl